bear attack in NJ

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9 years 1 month ago #1 by hidinginshadows
Aggressive bear sought in West Milford forest
Friday, June 25, 2010
BY RICHARD COWEN
The Record
STAFF WRITER
WEST MILFORD — State wildlife officials set a trap in the former Jungle Habitat woodlands on Friday seeking to capture a female black bear that pounced on a hiker and his dog.

A barrel trap has been set in the state-owned parklands, near the site where the attack occurred on Thursday morning. The bear, believed to be a female and the mother of three cubs, charged the hiker, identified as John Nies of West Milford, around 9:30 Thursday morning.

The bear was foraging in the woods when she encountered Nies and his dog. The bear jumped on Nies and knocked him down, then mauled the dog, state officials said.

Patrick Carr, the supervising wildlife biologist for the state Division of Fish and Wildlife, said Nies suffered minor cuts and scrapes, but the dog was seriously injured.

“The dog’s injuries were serious enough that it had to be taken to the animal hospital,” Carr said. “If we capture this bear, we will euthanize it.”

Attempts to reach Nies at his West Milford home on Friday were unsuccessful.

Carr said it didn’t appear that Nies or the dog did anything to provoke the bear. But the bear involved in Thursday’s attack is believed to have rushed a female hiker in the same area about a week ago. The hiker wasn’t injured during that encounter, but Carr said Thursday’s incident was further evidence there was a problem bear roaming the area.

Carr said black bears are on the roam, and if people see them in the woods, they should leave them alone.

“The berries are out and it’s breeding season,” Carr said. “Bears are on the move.”

Although bears are not prone to attacking humans, people should keep their distance and never try to feed them. The division of Fish and Wildlife advises that if a bear approaches, a person should clap his or her hands and make loud noises.

Thursday’s attack was the second major incident involving an aggressive bear in West Milford in as many days. On Wednesday night, Patrick and Kristine Flynn found a bear inside their house on Kushaqua Trail North, near Greenwood Lake. The couple chased the bear out of the house, which sutained damage to a door and several windows.

The state does not believe the same bear responsible for both incidents, Carr said. But a trap has been set at the Flynn residence, and that bear also will be euthanized if caught.

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WEST MILFORD — State wildlife officials set a trap in the former Jungle Habitat woodlands on Friday seeking to capture a female black bear that pounced on a hiker and his dog.

A barrel trap has been set in the state-owned parklands, near the site where the attack occurred on Thursday morning. The bear, believed to be a female and the mother of three cubs, charged the hiker, identified as John Nies of West Milford, around 9:30 Thursday morning.

The bear was foraging in the woods when she encountered Nies and his dog. The bear jumped on Nies and knocked him down, then mauled the dog, state officials said.

Patrick Carr, the supervising wildlife biologist for the state Division of Fish and Wildlife, said Nies suffered minor cuts and scrapes, but the dog was seriously injured.

“The dog’s injuries were serious enough that it had to be taken to the animal hospital,” Carr said. “If we capture this bear, we will euthanize it.”

Attempts to reach Nies at his West Milford home on Friday were unsuccessful.

Carr said it didn’t appear that Nies or the dog did anything to provoke the bear. But the bear involved in Thursday’s attack is believed to have rushed a female hiker in the same area about a week ago. The hiker wasn’t injured during that encounter, but Carr said Thursday’s incident was further evidence there was a problem bear roaming the area.

Carr said black bears are on the roam, and if people see them in the woods, they should leave them alone.

“The berries are out and it’s breeding season,” Carr said. “Bears are on the move.”

Although bears are not prone to attacking humans, people should keep their distance and never try to feed them. The division of Fish and Wildlife advises that if a bear approaches, a person should clap his or her hands and make loud noises.

Thursday’s attack was the second major incident involving an aggressive bear in West Milford in as many days. On Wednesday night, Patrick and Kristine Flynn found a bear inside their house on Kushaqua Trail North, near Greenwood Lake. The couple chased the bear out of the house, which sutained damage to a door and several windows.

The state does not believe the same bear responsible for both incidents, Carr said. But a trap has been set at the Flynn residence, and that bear also will be euthanized if caught

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